The Afterlife of Stars

This was the sort of book that pretentious Honors English college students gush over as “important” and “meaningful”.  Which, to me, usually meant it was weird, full of “lyricism”, and contained sentences that never seemed to end.  I wanted to like it.  I wanted it to be something special.  But I really, really hated it. 

A Bridge Across the Ocean

The beginning of this book was chillingly scary.  I’m not a scary story person, so it may not affect you in the same way.  But I read on well past my bedtime in hopes that I would not have nightmares.  It was a delicious beginning, and I was surprised that I liked it as much as I did.

Lucia, Lucia

Lucia, Lucia, like all of Trigiani’s books, includes themes of family and tradition.  It is set in New York City, just after World War II has ended.  Lucia is the only daughter of an Italian grocer.  Her brothers, loud and rambunctious, work for her father, while she is allowed to work as a seamstress at a high-end department store.  Lucia loves her family and culture, but struggles to make peace between responsibility and a desire to be more.