Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates

A while back, I read Kilmeade’s book on George Washington’s spy network during the Revolutionary War, and I was fascinated by the view of a forgotten (or overlooked) piece of history.  I heard that Kilmeade wrote another book, and knew I had to read it.

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The Vanquished

I started reading this book last month, and it was the sort of non-fiction book that made me want to read a pulpy fiction book at the same time.  I took a trip to Barnes & Noble to get book number 2 in Rick Riordan’s Magnus Chase series and walked out $100 lighter.  Always a hazard in my world.  This book was so very dry that I actually started reading three other books since I started it.

The Sword of Summer

Magnus Chase is a homeless kid living on the streets of Boston when he is attacked by a fantastic creature.  He finds out that is related to a Norse god, and that his destiny is bound to either saving or ending the world.  Armed with a magical sword, loyal friends, sarcasm, and a undying love of falafel, he rolls with it.  And adventure ensues.

A Bridge Across the Ocean

The beginning of this book was chillingly scary.  I’m not a scary story person, so it may not affect you in the same way.  But I read on well past my bedtime in hopes that I would not have nightmares.  It was a delicious beginning, and I was surprised that I liked it as much as I did.

Lily of the Nile

Most of us know the story of Cleopatra and Julius Caesar and Mark Antony.  I always thought of it as this golden moment in time, never really thinking too closely on the tragedy and historical resonance of the whole situation.  This book took me beyond that snapshot.